Academic Calendar 2017-2018

Sunday, September 17, 2017

Monday and Tuesday September 18th & 19th, 2017

Today's Quote:

Recap:

Quick- Notes:

Science is not a belief and doesn't care what you believe. Science relies on facts and evidence.

We do science to help us answer questions about the universe around us. This sometimes leads us to more questions or other observations. The ultimate goal of science is to make sense of our world.

Technology is applied science designed to make our lives easier. For example, a smart phone is a technology that was an improvement over a wired house phone. A wired house phone was an improvement over a morse code generator and that was an improvement over shouting over long distances to each other.

Science is based on facts and evidence and these can be observed or replicated under the same circumstances over and over again. 

A statement like, "I don't believe in evolution are ridiculous because evolution through natural selection is a fact that is backed up by observations that have been and can be repeated and evidence such as fossils that have been discovered.

Students then began to read the article, What is pseudo-science? The first thing students were tasked with, was to list any words they didn't know. We can't begin to talk about an article unless we're speaking the same language.

Homework was handed out at each grade level.

Start with an observation or question. Most of the methods begin this way. For example, I saw a movie where the dog could fly and I wondered, can my own dog fly?

Establish the question. We call this the CLAIM and it is written as a statement. For example, "My dog will fly if I pet it three times.

Look into the topic. This is something most science instruction gets wrong. Scientists and researchers spend 80% of their time doing research before they ever develop a hypothesis.

Formulate a hypothesis (and null hypothesis) (If:then, logical, testable

Investigate the hypothesis We said that a hypothesis is an underlying (hypo) thought or idea (thesis) about why something is going to happen and it must be able to pass the three tests of being logical, being an If/Then statement, and must be testable. If it fails even one of these tests, it's not a hypothesis. Keeping to our example, "If I pet my dog three times, then it will grow wings and fly. It IS an If/Then Statment, It IS testable, but it IS NOT logical.

Additionally, in order to combat BIAS, scientists formulate a NULL hypothesis which is the exact opposite of their hypothesis.

We also said that scientists don't stop to keep things nice and neat during the experimental phase of an investigation. It's ok to keep notes as long as you keep everything during the investigational phase. AFTER the investigation is done, scientists will begin to organize data into a nice neat format.

Examine the data- draw conclusions, analysis, perform more trials (how many?) This is when you organize your data and analyze it for patterns that might support your hypothesis and perform additional trials. Scientists perform as many trials as their time and budget allow them to do. 

Share your results (why?) Finally we share our results to allow other experts and peers to review our data and see if they can replicate the results found. If they can, then our data has been validated. If they can't then our data has been invalidated.


Entry Task/ Brain Bender:

A traffic cop was stopped at a red light. Professor James, who had his mind on a lecture he was about to give, drove his car right by him and through the light without stopping. The cop witnessed the entire scene but made no attempt to stop him. Why not?



General Agenda:

1. Hand back graded work
2. Review 

3. The Process of science: Take  SELFIES!

Start with an observation or question.

Establish the question.

Look into the topic.

Formulate a hypothesis (and null hypothesis) (If:then, logical, testable

Investigate the hypothesis

Examine the data- draw conclusions, analysis, perform more trials (how many?)

Share your results (why?)






9th Grade  Earth Space Science:

 Class Information and Syllabus

Unit Essential Question: How does a hypothesis, become a theory, become a Law and what the heck is the difference?  
Key Learning Statement: Scientists conduct investigations and use empirical evidence to reach conclusions about the natural world. 

Agenda:

History of Science Notes

Lab safety Rap 

3. What's the difference between a Hypothesis, Theory, and Law?


Homework: 

 Watch the following video on accuracy and precision AT HOME! Take notes and prepare to discuss.


Study for Vocabulary quiz Friday:
a- without
ab- from ( away from)
abduct- lead or draw [away] from
acanth- prickle or spine
acer- without horns
acetabul- vinegar cup
acin- cluster of grapes
acro- summit or top
actin- ray
acust- relating to hearing
ad- toward
adduct- to draw forward or in

HS Intensive English

 Class Information and Syllabus

Unit Essential Question: What does a good writing sample look like?
Key Learning Statement: Writers structure their writing into several key steps to produce a good writing sample. While these steps are not always needed, it is best for beginning or aspiring writers to practice them to improve their writing ability. Those steps are brainstorming, outlining, pre writing (or rough drafting), peer editing, polishing and revising, and final editing.


Art Appreciation: Storm Clouds, Maine by Marsden Hartley

Storm Clouds

Vocabulary Lesson: Context Clues

Writing Unit: Main Idea- Poetry

Homework: 

Study for vocabulary quiz 




10th Grade Biology 1

 Class Information and Syllabus

Unit Essential Question: How does a hypothesis, become a theory, become a Law and what the heck is the difference?  
Key Learning Statement: Scientists conduct investigations and use empirical evidence to reach conclusions about the natural world. 

Agenda:

History of Science Notes

Lab safety Rap 

3. What's the difference between a Hypothesis, Theory, and Law?


Homework: 

Read the article on How Does a Scientific Theory Become anScientific Law? Please take notes for discussion. Identify the controls and variables

Where Did Science Come From? Read through this article take notes YOU WILL BE LEADING THE DISCUSSION!

 Watch the following video on accuracy and precision AT HOME! Take notes and prepare to discuss.

Study for Vocabulary quiz Friday:
a- without
ab- from ( away from)
abduct- lead or draw [away] from
acanth- prickle or spine
acer- without horns
acetabul- vinegar cup
acin- cluster of grapes
acro- summit or top
actin- ray
acust- relating to hearing
ad- toward
adduct- to draw forward or in

Storm Updates:

As of 5am Monday morning, this was hurricane Maria's known position.


Check out the Global currents map!



Science Current Events:

China Lost Control of It's Space Station And It's Crashing To Earth!

Why It's Almost Impossible to Kill Tartigrades


The Best Graph of Global Climate Temperatures Ever!


Watch the Evolution of Bacteria In Just 10 Days!


For the First Time Ever, The Human Genome Has Been Edited By Scientists in a Highly Controversial Move.


Do Animals Possess a Soul?


Horses Can Use Symbolic Language to Communicate With Us.

Apps and Programs to Help You be Successful:

The 10 best note-taking apps




Video Links/ Other Resources over this topic

The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Thursday, September 7th, 2017 No school Friday or Monday due to Hurricane Irma!

Today's Quote:

Recap:

Yesterday we had a primer on hurricanes and preparedness for the approaching storm. I pointed out that hurricanes are like Mother Nature's cooling fans and they serve a purpose. As the oceans have tried to mitigate climate change by absorbing vast amounts of heat, we are seeing bigger, more powerful storms. A hurricane pulls excess heat and moisture from the surface of the oceans and injects it into the upper atmosphere where the heat can be dissipated into space. Unfortunately, this heat acts like jet fuel for the storm. In this case, Irma has been approaching the top of our ability to measure storms. Meteorologists have been talking recently about the need for a Category 6 to the scales. Be safe. Be prepared.

I asked the general question what is science? or why do we do it in the first place? Answered varied and included responses such as "science is technology", (It's not) "Science is a belief in research." (It's not) "Science is the search for answers." (Sort of) The discussion went on as I pointed out that my belief in a guiding force in the universe is a belief. I can hold onto the belief, but science is NOT a belief and it doesn't care what you believe- science relies on facts and evidence.

We engaged in a brief discussion of what science isn't and I introduced the classes to the Lakota word "wanagi" which loosely translates to ghosts. I pointed out that while I believe in ghosts, no matter how much personal evidence or examples I can give them as to why I believe in ghosts, I can't offer them any real scientific evidence that ghosts are real. We called into question TV shows like Ghost Hunters, where they have all that cool technology to prove the existence of ghosts, yet, it's not real science because their results cannot be replicated with any sort of reliability. Therefore the "science of ghost hunting" is actually a pseudo-science. This lead us into the beginning of a discussion of what constitutes evidence.

We tied our discussion from Tuesday in when students completed an entry activity called "Doing Science" which can be found on page 93 of the link. This lead to a very informative discussion of student ideas about what is and isn't science. Most of the classes were leaning toward the idea that all scientists must follow the scientific method. While I didn't tell them the correct answer, I asked why they believed this and they said," ït was how we have always been taught- that there is one method that scientists use to keep themselves organized."

Quick- Notes:

Science is not a belief and doesn't care what you believe. Science relies on facts and evidence.

We do science to help us answer questions about the universe around us. This sometimes leads us to more questions or other observations. The ultimate goal of science is to make sense of our world.

Technology is applied science designed to make our lives easier. For example, a smart phone is a technology that was an improvement over a wired house phone. A wired house phone was an improvement over a morse code generator and that was an improvement over shouting over long distances to each other.

Science is based on facts and evidence and these can be observed or replicated under the same circumstances over and over again. 

A statement like, "I don't believe in evolution are ridiculous because evolution through natural selection is a fact that is backed up by observations that have been and can be repeated and evidence such as fossils that have been discovered.

Students then began to read the article, What is pseudo-science? The first thing students were tasked with, was to list any words they didn't know. We can't begin to talk about an article unless we're speaking the same language.

Homework was handed out at each grade level.


Entry Task/ Brain Bender:

Dee Septor, the famous magician recently claimed that he had been to New York City performing a feat that no one else had accomplished. He boasted that he had walked on his hands for a mile and a half down a typical cement sidewalk before he lost his balance and fell. What is wrong with Dee Septor's claim?



Agenda:

1. All classes: test (Remind went out Sunday)
2. Discussion of citation and evidence. What is EVIDENCE?

3. The Process of science: Take  SELFIES!

Start with an observation or question.

Establish the question.

Look into the topic.

Formulate a hypothesis (and null hypothesis) (If:then, logical, testable

Investigate the hypothesis

Examine the data- draw conclusions, analysis, perform more trials (how many?)

Share your results (why?)


Start with an observation or question. Most of the methods begin this way. For example, I saw a movie where the dog could fly and I wondered, can my own dog fly?

Establish the question. We call this the CLAIM and it is written as a statement. For example, "My dog will fly if I pet it three times.

Look into the topic. This is something most science instruction gets wrong. Scientists and researchers spend 80% of their time doing research before they ever develop a hypothesis.

Formulate a hypothesis (and null hypothesis) (If:then, logical, testable

Investigate the hypothesis We said that a hypothesis is an underlying (hypo) thought or idea (thesis) about why something is going to happen and it must be able to pass the three tests of being logical, being an If/Then statement, and must be testable. If it fails even one of these tests, it's not a hypothesis. Keeping to our example, "If I pet my dog three times, then it will grow wings and fly. It IS an If/Then Statment, It IS testable, but it IS NOT logical.

Additionally, in order to combat BIAS, scientists formulate a NULL hypothesis which is the exact opposite of their hypothesis.

We also said that scientists don't stop to keep things nice and neat during the experimental phase of an investigation. It's ok to keep notes as long as you keep everything during the investigational phase. AFTER the investigation is done, scientists will begin to organize data into a nice neat format.

Examine the data- draw conclusions, analysis, perform more trials (how many?) This is when you organize your data and analyze it for patterns that might support your hypothesis and perform additional trials. Scientists perform as many trials as their time and budget allow them to do. 

Share your results (why?) Finally we share our results to allow other experts and peers to review our data and see if they can replicate the results found. If they can, then our data has been validated. If they can't then our data has been invalidated.

Bio/ Earth Science only discussion: Read the article "What is Pseudoscience What is science? What isn't Science? What looks like science, but really isn't science




9th Grade  Earth Space Science:

 Class Information and Syllabus

Unit Essential Question:
What are the basic ideas behind the process of science?
Key Learning Statement:
Science is a process based upon observational and experimental studies using scientific methods to develop or explore scientific theories or laws. 

Homework:


Where Did Science Come From? Read through this article take notes YOU WILL BE LEADING THE DISCUSSION!

 Watch the following video on accuracy and precision AT HOME! Take notes and prepare to discuss.

3. Watch this video on Calculating percent error. (MOE= margin of error) Discussion Thursday and Friday.


Study for Vocabulary quiz Friday:
a- without
ab- from ( away from)
abduct- lead or draw [away] from
acanth- prickle or spine
acer- without horns
acetabul- vinegar cup
acin- cluster of grapes
acro- summit or top
actin- ray
acust- relating to hearing
ad- toward
adduct- to draw forward or in

HS Intensive English

 Class Information and Syllabus

Unit Essential Question: What does a good writing sample look like?
Key Learning Statement: Writers structure their writing into several key steps to produce a good writing sample. While these steps are not always needed, it is best for beginning or aspiring writers to practice them to improve their writing ability. Those steps are brainstorming, outlining, pre writing (or rough drafting), peer editing, polishing and revising, and final editing.


Art Appreciation: Storm Clouds, Maine by Marsden Hartley

Storm Clouds

Vocabulary Lesson: Context Clues

Writing Unit: Main Idea- Poetry

Homework: 

Watch the video and take notes for discussion on Wednesday


Where Did Words Come From?

Study for vocabulary quiz Friday:
prodigious
blithe
ornithologist
antidote
levity
parody
apogee
callow
plethora
discern
compensate
feasible
cessation
assuaged
grimace
retaliated
chagrin
harbinger
assiduously
perpetrated.

10th Grade Biology 1

 Class Information and Syllabus

Unit Essential Question: What is required to carry out a valid scientific investigation?  
Key Learning Statement: A valid scientific investigation uses prior knowledge, observations, and empirical evidence to test a hypothesis and draw conclusions that must be validated through repetition and replication. 

Homework:

Where Did Science Come From? Read through this article take notes YOU WILL BE LEADING THE DISCUSSION!

 Watch the following video on accuracy and precision AT HOME! Take notes and prepare to discuss.

3. Watch this video on Calculating percent error. (MOE= margin of error) Discussion Thursday and Friday.

Study for Vocabulary quiz Friday:
a- without
ab- from ( away from)
abduct- lead or draw [away] from
acanth- prickle or spine
acer- without horns
acetabul- vinegar cup
acin- cluster of grapes
acro- summit or top
actin- ray
acust- relating to hearing
ad- toward
adduct- to draw forward or in


Storm Updates:

As of 5am Thursday morning, Irma is a Cat 5 storm with wind speeds sustained at 180 MPH and gust into the 200MPH range. This is the strongest storm to come out of the Atlantic ever recorded.


Check out the Global currents map!



Science Current Events:

Parallel Worlds Exist and Interact with This One.

Apps and Programs to Help You be Successful:

The 10 best note taking apps




Video Links/ Other Resources over this topic

How to have a Stress Free School Year

20 School Success Hacks and DIY's

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Tuesday September 5th & Wednesday September 6th, 2017 PREPARE FOR IRMA!

Today's Quote:


Recap:

Yesterday didn't give us much time for science as it was school picture day and it was our turn (science classes) to take students down, but we got there as fast as we could so we could get back to class and learn.

I asked the general question what is science? or why do we do it in the first place? Answered varied and included responses such as "science is technology", (It's not) "Science is a belief in research." (It's not) "Science is the search for answers." (Sort of) The discussion went on as I pointed out that my belief in a guiding force in the universe is a belief. I can hold onto the belief, but science is NOT a belief and it doesn't care what you believe- science relies on facts and evidence.

We engaged in a brief discussion of what science isn't and I introduced the classes to the Lakota word "wanagi"which loosely translates to ghosts. I pointed out that while I believe in ghosts, no matter how much personal evidence or examples I can give them as to why I believe in ghosts, I can't offer them any real scientific evidence that ghosts are real. We called into question TV shows like Ghost Hunters, where they have all that cool technology to prove the existence of ghosts, yet, it's not real science because their results cannot be replicated with any sort of reliability. Therefore the "science of ghost hunting"is actually a pseudo-science. This lead us into the beginning of a discussion of what constitutes evidence.

We tied our discussion from Tuesday in when students completed an entry activity called "Doing Science" which can be found on page 93 of the link. This lead to a very informative discussion of student ideas about what is and isn't science. Most of the classes were leaning toward the idea that all scientists must follow the scientific method. While I didn't tell them the correct answer, I asked why they believed this and they said," ït was how we have always been taught- that there is one method that scientists use to keep themselves organized."

Quick- Notes:

Science is not a belief and doesn't care what you believe. Science relies on facts and evidence.

We do science to help us answer questions about the universe around us. This sometimes leads us to more questions or other observations. The ultimate goal of science is to make sense of our world.

Technology is applied science designed to make our lives easier. For example, a smart phone is technology that was an improvement over a wired house phone. A wired house phone was an improvement over a morse code generator and that was an improvement over shouting over long distances to each other.

Science is based on facts and evidence and these can be observed or replicated under the same circumstances over and over again. 

A statement like, "I don't believe in evolution are ridiculous because evolution through natural selection is a fact that is backed up by observations that have been and can be repeated and evidence such as fossils that have been discovered.

Students then began to read the article, What is pseudo-science? The first thing students were tasked with, was to list any words they didn't know. We can't begin to talk about an article unless we're speaking the same language.

Homework was handed out at each grade level.


Entry Task/ Brain Bender:

A black dog stands in the middle of an intersection in a town painted completely black. None of the street lights are working due to a power outage caused by a local storm. A car with two broken headlights drives towards the dog but turns in time to avoid hitting him. How could the driver see the dog in time?



Agenda:

1. All classes: test (Remind went out Sunday)
2. Discussion of citation and evidence. What is EVIDENCE?

3. The Process of science: Take  SELFIES!

Start with an observation or question.

Establish the question.

Look into the topic.

Formulate a hypothesis (and null hypothesis) (If:then, logical, testable

Investigate the hypothesis

Examine the data- draw conclusions, analysis, perform more trials (how many?)

Share your results (why?)


Start with an observation or question. Most of the methods begin this way. For example, I saw a movie where the dog could fly and I wondered, can my own dog fly?

Establish the question. We call this the CLAIM and it is written as a statement. For example, "My dog will fly if I pet it three times.

Look into the topic. This is something most science instruction gets wrong. Scientists and researchers spend 80% of their time doing research before they ever develop a hypothesis.

Formulate a hypothesis (and null hypothesis) (If:then, logical, testable

Investigate the hypothesis We said that a hypothesis is an underlying (hypo) thought or idea (thesis) about why something is going to happen and it must be able to pass the three tests of being logical, being an If/Then statement, and must be testable. If it fails even one of these tests, it's not a hypothesis. Keeping to our example, "If I pet my dog three times, then it will grow wings and fly. It IS an If/Then Statment, It IS testable, but it IS NOT logical.

Additionally, in order to combat BIAS, scientists formulate a NULL hypothesis which is the exact opposite of their hypothesis.

We also said that scientists don't stop to keep things nice and neat during the experimental phase of an investigation. It's ok to keep notes as long as you keep everything during the investigational phase. AFTER the investigation is done, scientists will begin to organize data into a nice neat format.

Examine the data- draw conclusions, analysis, perform more trials (how many?) This is when you organize your data and analyze it for patterns that might support your hypothesis and perform additional trials. Scientists perform as many trials as their time and budget allow them to do. 

Share your results (why?) Finally we share our results to allow other experts and peers to review our data and see if they can replicate the results found. If they can, then our data has been validated. If they can't then our data has been invalidated.

Bio/ Earth Science only discussion: Read the article "What is Pseudoscience What is science? What isn't Science? What looks like science, but really isn't science




9th Grade  Earth Space Science:

 Class Information and Syllabus

Unit Essential Question:
What are the basic ideas behind the process of science?
Key Learning Statement:
Science is a process based upon observational and experimental studies using scientific methods to develop or explore scientific theories or laws. 

Homework:


Where Did Science Come From? Read through this article take notes YOU WILL BE LEADING THE DISCUSSION!

 Watch the following video on accuracy and precision AT HOME! Take notes and prepare to discuss.

3. Watch this video on Calculating percent error. (MOE= margin of error) Discussion Thursday and Friday.


Study for Vocabulary quiz Friday:
a- without
ab- from ( away from)
abduct- lead or draw [away] from
acanth- prickle or spine
acer- without horns
acetabul- vinegar cup
acin- cluster of grapes
acro- summit or top
actin- ray
acust- relating to hearing
ad- toward
adduct- to draw forward or in

HS Intensive English

 Class Information and Syllabus

Unit Essential Question: What does a good writing sample look like?
Key Learning Statement: Writers structure their writing into several key steps to produce a good writing sample. While these steps are not always needed, it is best for beginning or aspiring writers to practice them to improve their writing ability. Those steps are brainstorming, outlining, pre writing (or rough drafting), peer editing, polishing and revising, and final editing.


Art Appreciation: Storm Clouds, Maine by Marsden Hartley

Storm Clouds

Vocabulary Lesson: Context Clues

Writing Unit: Main Idea- Poetry

Homework: 

Watch the video and take notes for discussion on Wednesday


Where Did Words Come From?

Study for vocabulary quiz Friday:
prodigious
blithe
ornithologist
antidote
levity
parody
apogee
callow
plethora
discern
compensate
feasible
cessation
assuaged
grimace
retaliated
chagrin
harbinger
assiduously
perpetrated.

10th Grade Biology 1

 Class Information and Syllabus

Unit Essential Question: What is required to carry out a valid scientific investigation?  
Key Learning Statement: A valid scientific investigation uses prior knowledge, observations, and empirical evidence to test a hypothesis and draw conclusions that must be validated through repetition and replication. 

Homework:

Where Did Science Come From? Read through this article take notes YOU WILL BE LEADING THE DISCUSSION!

 Watch the following video on accuracy and precision AT HOME! Take notes and prepare to discuss.

3. Watch this video on Calculating percent error. (MOE= margin of error) Discussion Thursday and Friday.

Study for Vocabulary quiz Friday:
a- without
ab- from ( away from)
abduct- lead or draw [away] from
acanth- prickle or spine
acer- without horns
acetabul- vinegar cup
acin- cluster of grapes
acro- summit or top
actin- ray
acust- relating to hearing
ad- toward
adduct- to draw forward or in


Storm Updates:

As of 5am Wednesday morning, Irma is a Cat 5 storm with wind speeds sustained at 185 MPH and gust into the 200MPH range. This is the strongest storm to come out of the Atlantic ever recorded. As I explained in class yesterday, hurricanes are Mother Nature's cooling fans. As the oceans have been absorbing enormous amounts of heat from global climate change, bigger more powerful storms are needed to cool the planet. A hurricane moves over the surface of the ocean and pulls warm moist air from the surface and injects it into the upper atmosphere where it cools. This process acts as a sort of "engine"driving the storm. Right now Irma is a Cat 5 while over open cooler water. It's potential to strengthen as it approaches the warm Carribean waters is strong. Most of the models now show it turning at the last minute and coming directly up the middle of the state by Sunday or Monday.


Check out the Global currents map!



Science Current Events:

Parallel Worlds Exist and Interact with This One.

Apps and Programs to Help You be Successful:

The 10 best note taking apps




Video Links/ Other Resources over this topic

How to have a Stress Free School Year

20 School Success Hacks and DIY's

Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Thursday and Friday August 31st & September 1st, 2017

Today's Quote:


Recap:

We finally got into the graphing presentation as students lead the discussion after finishing up Biology benchmark testing. Intensive English classes should finish today. We started off by teaching students how to remember that the X axis is ALWAYS the horizontal one ( the one laying down) and the Y- axis is always the vertical one. (standing up) I told them that I remember the X- axis, because I see dead people. While this sounds strange, I asked them what a dead person does and they said they lay down. I then asked them how they know it's dead and not just sleeping, (referring to the stick figure I wrote on the board). They said that, in cartoons, they are usually dead if they have X's on their eyes, so I drew two X's. There you have it! The X- axis is the one that lays down because Ï see dead people. I then asked the classes where the Z axis is. After several attempts and hearing their misconceptions, I pointed out that to see the Z axis we would have to pretend the screen wasn't mounted on the wall, but instead was mounted in the middle of the class. The Z- axis allows us to begin to graph a 3-dimensional world so it is the axis that originates at the intersection (origin- see definition 6) of the X and Y axis but runs out into the class and behind the screen. At least one student asked the very valid question- "why are we learning about graphing in Biology." I explained that as part of the course if they checked the YAG (year at a glance)I gave them as part of their syllabus, it shows a unit called the Nature of Science. In this unit, we will cover the prerequisite skills that students should have learned in the lower grades, but many did not.

After that, I pointed out that in science, the Independent variable (test) is ALWAYS represented on the X- axis. and the Dependent variable (outcome) is always represented on the Y-axis. We then went on to say that when constructing a good graph title it will always follow the formula, Y vs X. If I were testing the effects of an amount of fertilizer on plant growth. The amount of fertilizer is my Independent variable- because I am changing the amounts and the plant growth is the dependent variable. A good graph title then would be (Y vs X) The Growth Of Plants Over The Amount Of Fertilizer Applied.

Students also pointed out that there must be an accurate title on each axis as well as the units the values are measured in. Students pointed out that the values must have regularly spaced intervals (literally "the space between values"). In other words, you could not start off counting by two's and then switch to fives. Students also remembered that graphs don't always have to start at zero. We then went to the computer lab to begin graphing data in Google Docs. 

NOTE: Every student MUST know their Marion students username and password or have a gmail account that they can access from school. We are spending far too much time finding this information. Please arrive in class having a valid Gmail account or access to your school email.

Required Dataset for graph: ( All classes included in counts) 

Architect: 0                        Logician: 4                 Commander: 5          Debater: 6                      Advocate:  7                      Mediator:10                  Protagonist: 6             Campaigner: 14         Logistician: 4                     Defender:  4               Executive:  5                Consul: 13                          Virtuoso:  5                        Adventurer:  2           Entrepreneur: 3            Entertainer: 7

Data Set complete!


Entry Task/ Brain Bender:


Parents, please be aware of my hall pass policy. Every student has three hall passes per nine weeks and each pass is good for three minutes. That means that every student has basically 10 minutes they can miss from class. I will, of course, accommodate any emergencies or hygiene issues without question. If, however, emergencies increase in frequency, I will call you each and every time they ask to leave class. I am not teaching in the bathroom and I NEED students to be in the classroom. If I allowed students to be out of class even 10 times in a nine week period they will have missed 30 minutes of instructional time. Please encourage your child to use the restroom, fill water bottles, and socialize in the 5 minutes they have between classes. 


Agenda:

Today, we will begin our benchmark test in all subject areas. This test will probably take all period. Results will be used to determine knowledge already gained. PLEASE do your best. It is the only way I can accurately assess what I need to cover to help you be successful.


 Graphing Basics PowerPoint- 

1. Watch the video and take notes for Monday.

How to Use Google Spreadsheet to Make a Graph

3. Discussion of citation and evidence.



9th Grade  Earth Space Science:

 Class Information and Syllabus

Unit Essential Question:
What are the basic ideas behind the process of science?
Key Learning Statement:
Science is a process based upon observational and experimental studies using scientific methods to develop or explore scientific theories or laws. 

Homework:

Read the article: 

The article explaining graphing differences between math and science. Takes notes for discussion


HS Intensive English

 Class Information and Syllabus

Unit Essential Question: What does a good writing sample look like?
Key Learning Statement: Writers structure their writing into several key steps to produce a good writing sample. While these steps are not always needed, it is best for beginning or aspiring writers to practice them to improve their writing ability. Those steps are brainstorming, outlining, prewriting (or rough drafting), peer editing, polishing and revising, and final editing.

Homework: 

Watch the video and take notes for discussion on Wednesday


Where Did Words Come From?


10th Grade Biology 1

 Class Information and Syllabus

Unit Essential Question: What is required to carry out a valid scientific investigation?  
Key Learning Statement: A valid scientific investigation uses prior knowledge, observations, and empirical evidence to test a hypothesis and draw conclusions that must be validated through repetition and replication. 

Homework:

Read the Article:

Article explaining graphing differences between math and science. Takes notes for discussion





Science Current Events:

Parallel Worlds Exist and Interact with This One.

Apps and Programs to Help You be Successful:

The 10 best note taking apps




Video Links/ Other Resources over this topic

How to have a Stress Free School Year

20 School Success Hacks and DIY's