Academic Calendar 2017-2018

Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Thursday and Friday November 3rd and 4th, 2016

Today's Quote:


'The only calibration that counts is how much heart people invest, how much they ignore their fears of being hurt or caught out or humiliated. And the only thing people regret is that they didn't live boldly enough, that they didn't invest enough heart, didn't love enough.' ~ Ted Hughes 




Recap:

What a week! Tuesday I was out on an Honor's field trip to Belleview HS which is a fantastic school for 8th-grade students to consider as their next step. They offer a medium sized campus (1600 students vs West Port's 3,400 and Dunnellon's 700) They have a variety of awesome specialty program and many options for students to volunteer and get involved with clubs providing a well-rounded educational experience as well as college opportunities not available at some of the other schools.

In 6th-grade, we discovered weather fronts and looked at the overall global weather patterns and what drives them (the sun). Students saw a demonstration of how warm air rises and cool air sinks and how that causes lateral movement across the land.

7-th graders continued their microscopic tour of the cell using the BBC's Secret Life of the Cell. This is in preparation of the upcoming quiz over the organelles and cell theory.

8th- grade began walking through time and meeting some of the great minds behind the modern atomic theory. We are supposed to begin a lab, Thickness of a BB pancake, on Friday, but I will be out again at a medical symposium hosted by UF. This should give me some background training in the current Zika Virus and how we are searching for ways to combat tropical vectors moving further north on a continually warming planet.

Wednesday was a half day and reward opportunities for students who met their AR goals and had no referrals for the fist nine weeks.

We had several impromptu teachable moments this week that were a sobering reminder of why humans should not use rat and mouse poisons. Our mated pair of Great Horned Owls, were found dead on the campus. Florida Fish and Wildlife came to collect them, but students got the change to see and touch them up close while I went over their adaptations. I pointed out that while a person might see a mouse or rat, that doesn't mean there is a mouse or rat problem. One of these owls eats anywhere from 4 to 6 rats each night. Now that they're gone, we might have a rat problem. Man made controls like rat poison are dangerous as they kill ANY animal that manages to find them and it biomagnifies in the target animal. This means that since it doesn't kill the animal  immediately, they go out into the environment and are eaten by things like owls who then die as a result of having the concentrated poison in their system. Several students went out with me to try and find the baby owlets we have seen in their nest.

Last night was an incredibly sad night as the squirrel, Anubis,  I rescued and the kids have been raising was happily racing around his cage when he fell breaking his spine. I rushed him to the vet and the X-rays confirmed my fears. The vet said it was possible he might recover so I brought him home to make him as comfortable as possible, but he passed away last night. Rest in peace buddy, you taught them well in your short time on Earth. 





Brain bender:


Sherlock heard that Sam Smythe had drawn up a detailed plan to rob a local bank. He brought Sam in for questioning, and naturally, Sam was struck with one of his memory lapses. Sam denied the existence of such a plan at first, but finally broke down and agreed to tell the truth. Sam said he thought he was being tailed, so he ducked into the local library and hid his plan in a book. He said he was certain it was between pages 125 and 126, but he had been so intent on committing those pages to memory that he had forgotten the name of the book. Ït's obvious you're lying,"said Sherlock. What was wrong with Sam's explanation?



Agenda:

(This should be written in your planner every day)

7th grade- finish video- take quiz

 6th grade- quiz over weather systems

8th grade- Go over questions from  Prelab

 The Atom- Read the chapter and take notes! If you have questions, write them down!

Read the Pre-lab "The Thickness of a BB pancake



6th Grade Honor's Earth Space Science:

6th Grade Class Information and Syllabus

Weather and Atmosphere:
Unit Essential Question: How do the relationships among the five spheres affect life on Earth
How do the relationships among the five spheres affect life on Earth? 
Key Learning Statement: The atmosphere is layered and within these layers are weather patterns that affect life and are caused by interactions among spheres. Water is constantly being recycled through the spheres.  Heat transfer affects the development of weather. 

Homework: 

Weather Systems- Video watch and take notes

Weather Systems Study Guide



7th Grade Honors Life Science

7th Grade Class Information and Syllabus

Cell Structure and Function
Unit Essential Question: How has technology enhanced our understanding of cells? 

Key Learning Statement: As microscope technology advances, scientists understanding of cells is changing. Scientists continue to grow in their understanding of how a cell's structure and function are related to help maintain homeostasis.

Homework: 

The Life of a Cell- Video Watch and take notes





8th Grade Honors Physical Science

8th Grade Class Information and Syllabus

Properties of Matter
Unit Essential Question: What determines the properties of matter? 
Key Learning Statement: The atom is the basic unit of matter.  The structure, motion, arrangement and energy of the atom determine the properties of matter. 

Homework:


History of Atomic Theory Notes




Science Current Events:

Undead Genes Come Alive After You Die! ZOMBIES!

Geomagnetic Strom Going On Right Now!

How Scientists Successfully Treated a Bat For White Nose Disease

Is It Bad To Hold Your Pee?

Marine Mammals Grieve For Their Dead 


Apps and Programs to Help You be Successful:



Video Links/ Other Resources over this topic

The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows

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